PERMANENT ELECTRIC FENCING A COST EFFECTIVE SOLUTION

New developments, including smartphone technologies, mean permanent electric fencing could be on course for a big increase in interest, especially as farmers look to improve use of grazing.

Mark Oliver, UK Sales Manager with Gallagher UK, believes many livestock farmers will be tempted to give permanent electric fencing another look as the focus moves closely onto effective use of grass.

“Our new generation of fencing products mean the current in monitored across the entire fence network many times a second.  Should the current fail due to, for example, vegetation touching the fence, the system will automatically respond and increase the power going through the fence.

“Should the fence fail, an alarm will sound allowing the fence to be checked and repaired quickly.  The alarm can be directed to several smartphones meaning the farmer and stockmen can all be informed.  In this way the integrity of the fence is always maintained.”

He believes that with all farmers looking to improve the utilisation of forages, particularly grazing, a fencing infrastructure based on a combination of permanent and temporary fences is the optimum solution.

Gallagher has invested in new technology across the range of materials required to construct permanent fencing infrastructures.  The new iSeries of energisers offer higher power ratings to deliver maximum power to fences up to 53km long, while strategically positioned fence monitors provide real-time information on fence operation.  All energisers come with a seven year warranty for increased confidence.

The patented self-insulating Insultimber posts are 70% more cost-effective that traditional electric fence posts, require no external insulators and are guaranteed for 25 years.

“A well-designed infrastructure can set a business up for many years,” Mr Oliver continues.  ““On average, a permanent electric fence is around 25-30% cheaper to install than an equivalent traditional fence and a high capacity energiser will cost around £30 per year to run, which is less that the running cost of a battery powered unit.”

www.gallagher.eu