ABRASIVE WHEELS TRAINING – WHO NEEDS TO DO IT?

The answer is simple – anyone that uses or changes an abrasive wheel should have received training on how to use and maintain them safely. The training is a legal requirement under the Provision and Use of Work Equipment Regulations 1998 (PUWER 98) – and states that anyone changing a disc must have undergone training; they must be competent; the person changing the wheel must have been nominated as a designated person for the task by his/her employer and that the employer records this nomination. Under the regulations the scope has been widened for training to also include those manufacturing, specifying, selling, purchasing, supervising and using abrasive wheels.

However, despite this legal requirement, the accident statistics indicate nearly half of all accidents involving abrasive wheels are due to an unsafe system of work or operator error.

HSG17 ‘Safety in the use of abrasive wheels’ is the Health and Safety Executive (HSE) Guidance Note for abrasive wheels and you can download a free copy of the comprehensive guide from the HSE website http://www.hse.gov. uk/pubns/books/hsg17.htm The guidance notes give advice on precautions you should take to prevent accidents; the risk of wheel breakage and safe ways of working to reduce all these risks.

However, there is no substitute for practical training in all aspects of mounting and using abrasive wheels; and any training programme should at least cover the following areas:

• Hazards and risks arising from use and precautions

• Identify methods of marking abrasive wheels with type, size and minimum operating speed

• Storage and transportation

• Inspection and testing for damage

• Correct method of mounting an abrasive wheel with knowledge of the functions of all components used with abrasive wheels

• How to assemble abrasive wheels correctly so they are fit for use

• Methods of dressing an abrasive wheel to remove material from the cutting surface or correct uneven wear

• Adjustments of work rests on pedestal or bench grinding machines

• Use of PPE
• Proper training in the above

areas can help reduce the hazards from use of abrasive wheels including contact injuries; physical injury from flying particles; inhalation of dust; noise and vibration; hand-arm vibration and manual handling.

The answer is simple – anyone that uses or changes an abrasive wheel should have received training on how to use and maintain them safely. The training is a legal requirement under the Provision and Use of Work Equipment Regulations 1998 (PUWER 98) – and states that anyone changing a disc must have undergone training; they must be competent; the person changing the wheel must have been nominated as a designated person for the task by his/her employer and that the employer records this nomination. Under the regulations the scope

has been widened for training to also include those manufacturing, specifying, selling, purchasing, supervising and using abrasive wheels.

However, despite this legal requirement, the accident statistics indicate nearly half of all accidents involving abrasive wheels are due to an unsafe system of work or operator error.

HSG17 ‘Safety in the use of abrasive wheels’ is the Health and Safety Executive (HSE) Guidance Note for abrasive wheels and you can download a free copy of the comprehensive guide from the HSE website http://www.hse.gov. uk/pubns/books/hsg17.htm The guidance notes give advice on precautions you should take to prevent accidents; the risk of wheel breakage and safe ways of working to reduce all these risks.

However, there is no substitute for practical training in all aspects of mounting and using abrasive wheels; and any training programme should at least cover the following areas:

• Hazards and risks arising from use and precautions

• Identify methods of marking abrasive wheels with type, size and minimum operating speed

• Storage and transportation

• Inspection and testing for damage

• Correct method of mounting an abrasive wheel with knowledge of the functions of all components used with abrasive wheels

• How to assemble abrasive wheels correctly so they are fit for use

• Methods of dressing an abrasive wheel to remove material from the cutting surface or correct uneven wear

• Adjustments of work rests on pedestal or bench grinding machines

• Use of PPE
• Proper training in the above

areas can help reduce the hazards from use of abrasive wheels including contact injuries; physical injury from flying particles; inhalation of dust; noise and vibration; hand-arm vibration and manual handling.

Fencing and Construction Training Ltd (FaCT) run the course as a half day training course with a certificate of attainment which is valid for three years. The training can be teamed up with another practical half day training course like CAT & Genny; safe use of power tools or manual handling to make efficient use of time for the individual and the company.

These courses run on a regular basis at the FaCT sites in Redditch, nr Birmingham and Greater Manchester & Lancs or if you have a group of people FaCT can send the trainer to your site. FaCT also can offer funding to support the Fencing Apprenticeship in England and this programme includes the above half day courses.

For more information please call the FaCT team on 0121 476 4731.